Don’t Panic: 9 Articles to Help You if You’re Second-Guessing Your New Job

Don’t Panic: 9 Articles to Help You if You’re Second-Guessing Your New Job
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So many of us have been there. After dry cleaning all of your best suits, taking time off work to perfect your resume, and participating in several rounds of interviews, you finally land an awesome and exciting new job. Only “awesome and exciting” may be overstating things a bit.

You’re barely a month in and hardly over the moon about this place. Perhaps your boss is a micromanager. You’re not making any work friends. Every time you complete an assignment, you receive feedback, and it’s not the gold-star kind. The work itself is not actually all that great.

No matter the case, if you think your new job sucks, before you just up and quit, consider the following:

1. 4 Insane Thoughts Everyone Has When Starting a New Job (and How to Keep Your Crazy in Check)

“I tricked them into hiring me,” “I miss my old job,” “I’ve ruined everything.” These are just a few of the thoughts that run through our heads when starting something unfamiliar—even if you’re the Editor-In-Chief of The Muse. Here’s how to temper the negative thoughts and not assume the worst off the bat.

2. 3 Awkward Situations You’ll Face at a New Job (and How to Deal)

So much can go wrong on your first day—or week—in the office. Perhaps you introduce yourself to the CEO (even though you literally just interviewed with them a few days ago), or you struggle awkwardly with a wonky restroom door in front of your new boss. No matter the blunder, you can learn from these three mistakes; they’re not the end of the world.

3. What You Can Realistically Do When Your New Job Catfishes You

You thought you were applying to this really amazing job, but when you get there it turns out you’re making cold calls all day long. Here’s what to do if the role you signed up for isn’t anything like you thought you were getting into.

4. 4 Things You Should Do When You Hate Your New Job (That Don’t Involve Beating Yourself Up)

Maybe you need to take a step back and ask yourself why you don’t like your new job. Often the things we hate about our new jobs have more to do with a temporary transitional phase than a permanent problem. Here are four ways to make your new job work for you.

5. 3 Things You’re Overthinking at Your New Job (and 3 Things You’re Not Thinking About Enough)

Are you staying late enough at work? Are you asking too many questions? Did you say the wrong thing to one of your co-workers? Perhaps you don’t like your new job because you’re overthinking everything. Here’s what you should be focusing on instead.

6. Can You Leave a Job After Just a Few Months?

What if you just don’t fit in? Or perhaps the company culture isn’t a good fit. Even if you’re only a few months into your new job, it’s OK to reassess your career under the right conditions. Here’s advice on figuring out what the best decision is for you.

7. What Actually Happened When I Quit My Job After Three Months

As someone who’s been there, Muse writer, Kat Boogaard knows first-hand what it’s like to move onto something better after only three months on the job. Here’s what happened—and why it was one of the best decisions she’s ever made.

8. Why I Quit 2 Jobs in Less Than a Year

After only a month on the job, political consultant, Grady O’Brien knew the job wasn’t a good fit for him. Twice. At first he thought he was the problem—until he realized there’d been other jobs he’d loved, and that he’d stayed with for longer periods of time. Sometimes finding the right fit just takes a little trial and error.

9. 3 Steps to Take if You’re Still Struggling to Settle Into a Not-So-New Job

At first you might have to get to know the company, learn how to complete your tasks, and set up your space at the office—but if you’re still doing these introductory things several months into a position, something has to change. Integrate yourself with your teammates, talk with your boss, and organize your desk. It’s high time to get settled.

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